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Anthony Hecht Essay, Research Paper

The Parodies and Narratives of Atrocity of Anthony Hecht

Anthony Hecht, a past Pulitzer Prize winning poet and a former United States Poet Laureate, is arguably one of America & # 8217 ; s best poets of the post-modern epoch. Born in 1923, he rose to literary prominence in the 1950s and 1960s with the publication of two books A Summoning of Stones ( 1954 ) and The Hard Hours ( 1967 ) . In his authorship, he uses humor to make a state of affairs for lampoon and uses sarcasm in his & # 8220 ; narrations of atrociousness & # 8221 ; ( Hecht, Vol. 19 209 ) .

Anthony Hecht & # 8217 ; s poesy is renowned for its illustrations of lampoon that are all creative activities of his & # 8220 ; classical eruditeness and humor & # 8221 ; ( Hecht, Vol. 19 207 ) . He attempts to demo the contrast between artistic, false positions of life and rough world through witty lampoon as seen in & # 8220 ; Nominalism & # 8221 ; and & # 8220 ; The Dover Bitch: A Criticism of Life & # 8221 ; ( Hecht, Vol. 19 207 ) . The humor provides poesy with strong, underlying significance as seen in & # 8220 ; Nominalism: & # 8221 ;

Higgledy-piggledy

Juliet Capulet

Cherished the tenderest

Ideas of a rose:

& # 8220 ; What & # 8217 ; s in a name? & # 8221 ; said she,

Etymologically

& # 8220 ; Save that all Montagues

Stink in God & # 8217 ; s nose. & # 8221 ; ( Readings )

Hecht creates lampoon in this piece by telling a dramatic scene with a knowing and humourous attack to the literature. The lampoon of Juliet Capulet & # 8217 ; s celebrated line in Romeo and Juliet

with such preciseness and trade as to suit both the metre and the authoritative Shakespearian linguistic communication provides an illustration of Hecht & # 8217 ; s usage of humor to make a lampoon ( Hecht, Vol. 8 269 ) . Hecht uses humor and lampoon in a similar mode in & # 8220 ; The Dover Bitch: A Criticism of Life & # 8221 ; which is a lampoon of Matthew Arnold & # 8217 ; s & # 8220 ; Dover Beach. & # 8221 ; The tragic vision presented in the & # 8220 ; The Dover Bitch & # 8221 ; is of blunt contrast to the romantic and idealistic vision of & # 8220 ; Dover Beach & # 8221 ; ( Brown 121 ) . Here Hecht shows through the usage of humor the falsity of Arnold & # 8217 ; s beautiful yet unrealistic verse form. & # 8220 ; Dover Beach & # 8221 ; ends with Arnold explicating to his miss that the lone certain thing in this universe is their relationship:

Ah, love, allow us be true

To one another! for the universe, which seems

To lie before us like a land of dreams,

So assorted, so beautiful, so new,

Hath truly neither joy, nor love, nor visible radiation,

Nor cocksureness, nor peace, nor aid for hurting ;

And we are here as on a darkling field

Swept with baffled dismaies of battle and flight,

Where nescient ground forcess clash by dark. ( Arnold 648 )

Arnold & # 8217 ; s belief in the relationship of himself and this miss while saying that it is more stable than anything else in the universe allows Hecht an easy avenue for unfavorable judgment of Arnold & # 8217 ; s belief. Consequently, Hecht & # 8217 ; s poem Begins with lines that convey the harsh world that nil in the universe will last and particularly non the love between two people ( Brown 121 ) :

So at that place stood Matthew Arnold and this miss

With the drops of England crumpling off behind them,

And he said to her, & # 8220 ; Try to be true to me,

And I & # 8217 ; ll do the same to you, for things are bad

All over, etc. , etc. & # 8221 ; ( Hecht, & # 8220 ; The Dover Bitch & # 8221 ; 1632 )

In the same mode that Hecht employs humor and lampoon, he besides employs sarcasm and & # 8220 ; narrations of atrociousness & # 8221 ; ( Hecht, Vol. 19 209 ) . Four verse form & # 8220 ; Birdwatchers of America, & # 8221 ; & # 8220 ; More Light! More Light! , & # 8221 ; & # 8220 ; The Vow, & # 8221 ; and & # 8220 ; Christmas is Coming & # 8221 ; are the finest illustrations of this type of Hechtian poesy. & # 8220 ; Birdwatchers of America & # 8221 ; utilizes sarcasm to make turns in the verse form in its usage of a dove as the bird that pecks out the eyes of a dead adult male ( Hecht, & # 8220 ; Birdwatchers of America & # 8221 ; 1072 ) . This usage of the dove, typically a bird that represents peace, displays the function sarcasm dramas in Hecht & # 8217 ; s plants:

It & # 8217 ; s all really good to dream of a dove that saves,

Picasso & # 8217 ; s or the Pope & # 8217 ; s,

The 1 that yearly coos in Our Lady & # 8217 ; s ear

One-half of the universe & # 8217 ; s hopes & # 8230 ;

For case, the adult female following door, whom we hear at dark,

Claims that when she was little

She found a adult male rock dead near the cedar trees

After the first snowfall.

The air was clear. He seemed in ultimate peace

Except that he had no eyes. Rigid and bright

Upon the brow, furred

With a light hoar, crouched an hideous bird. ( Hecht, & # 8220 ; Birdwatchers of America & # 8221 ; 1072-1073 )

The dove is foremost described as being a animal of godly inspiration helping as both a Muse to creative persons and the Christian church, but the expected & # 8220 ; positive & # 8221 ; stoping is thwarted by the horrific and dry image of a dove sitting upon the brow of a adult male losing his eyes. A bird that possesses a positive intension pecks out a adult male & # 8217 ; s ey

Es. Having a dove act in such a mode creates the sarcasm Hecht seeks in this verse form ( Hecht, Vol. 19 210 ) . “More Light! More Light! ” besides employs sarcasm in order to convey its “narrative of atrocity” ( Hecht, Vol. 19 209 ) . A Pole working at Buchenwald, a Nazi concentration cantonment, is shot for declining to delve a grave for two Hebrews.

No visible radiation, no visible radiation in the bluish Polish oculus.

When he finished a siting boot packed down the Earth.

The Luger hovered lightly in its baseball mitt.

He was shot in the abdomen and in three hours bled to decease.

No supplications or incense rose up in those hours

Which grew to be old ages, and every twenty-four hours came deaf-and-dumb person

Ghosts from the ovens sifting through chip air,

And settled upon his eyes in a black carbon black. ( Hecht, & # 8220 ; More Light! & # 8221 ; 1073-1074 & # 8221 ; )

On the surface, his deficiency of a proper burial represents the deficiency of declaration in the struggle of World War II. However, it more deeply connotes Hecht & # 8217 ; s continual subject of adult male & # 8217 ; s inhumaneness to his fellow worlds every bit good as the devastation of humanity. The sarcasm stems from the fact that the lone entombment he received came from the carbon black from the ovens used to fire the Jews.

& # 8220 ; The Vow & # 8221 ; is a upseting verse form that relates the narration of a male parent & # 8217 ; s conversation with his late miscarried kid ( Hecht, Vol. 19 207 ) . The image of the bloody, amorphous kid speaks to the male parent, and the kid & # 8217 ; s remarks set up the sarcasm that shows the & # 8220 ; narrative of atrociousness: & # 8221 ; & # 8220 ; Mourn instead for all/Who breathlessly issue from the bone gates, /The Gatess of horn, /For truly it is best of all the fates/Not to be born & # 8221 ; ( Hecht, & # 8220 ; The Vow & # 8221 ; 726 ) . The kid presents the position that ne’er life is the best destiny which depicts Hecht & # 8217 ; s position that & # 8220 ; hurting and heartache mix so homogeneously with the material of being that we may presume their ubiquity & # 8221 ; ( Hecht, Vol 13. 269 ) . Finally, & # 8220 ; Christmas is Coming & # 8221 ; is a poem reflective of Hecht & # 8217 ; s clip spent in the Army during World War II. Hecht develops sarcasm in this piece by touching to the old Christmas carol that states & # 8220 ; Christmas is coming. The goose is acquiring fat./Please put a penny in the Old Man & # 8217 ; s hat & # 8221 ; ( Brown 118 ) . Hecht in his verse form uses barbarous imagination to convey the rough state of affairs that existed for the soldiers at the Battle of the Bulge:

Must happen out thistles to retrieve hurting.

Keep to the frozen land or else be killed.

Yet creeping one brushs in the dark

The frigid carcases of birds, their pess

And wings all glazed. And still we crawl to larn

Where hurting was lost, how to retrieve hurting.

Reach for the brambles, crawl to them and make,

Seizing for irritants, hunt carefully to experience

The point of irritants, life & # 8217 ; s Crown, the Old Man & # 8217 ; s hat. ( Brown 118-119 )

The sarcasm is that frozen, malnourished birds surround the soldier narrating the verse form ( Brown 118 ) . Futher sarcasm exists in the description of the soldier seeking out the hurting of the irritants. The hurting which most soldiers try to avoid, ironically, is here the lone thing that reminds the soldier he is alive ( Hecht, Vol. 19 209 )

Anthony Hecht & # 8217 ; s poesy contains elements such as humor, lampoon, sarcasm, and the & # 8220 ; narrations of atrociousness & # 8221 ; that make him standout as a current poet. His poems effort to convey what he sees as the rough world of the universe to readers.

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Arnold, Matthew. & # 8220 ; Dover Beach. & # 8221 ; The Bedford Introduction to Literature. Ed. Michael Meyer. 3rd erectile dysfunction. Boston: St. Martin & # 8217 ; s Press, 1993. 648-649.

Brown, Ashley. & # 8220 ; The Poetry of Anthony Hecht. & # 8221 ; Modern Critical Positions: Contemporary Poets. Ed. Harold Bloom. New York: Chelsea House, 1986. 113-126.

Hecht, Anthony. & # 8220 ; Birdwatchers of America. & # 8221 ; Norton & # 8217 ; s Anthology of Modern Poetry. Eds. Richard Ellman and Robert O & # 8217 ; Clair. 2nd erectile dysfunction. New York: W.W. Norton, 1988. 1072-1073.

& # 8220 ; Hecht, Anthony. & # 8221 ; Contemporary Literary Criticism. Vol. 8. Detroit: Gale Research Co. , 1978. 266-269.

& # 8220 ; Hecht, Anthony. & # 8221 ; Contemporary Literary Criticism. Vol. 13. Detroit: Gale Research Co. , 1980. 269-270.

& # 8220 ; Hecht, Anthony. & # 8221 ; Contemporary Literary Criticism. Vol. 19. Detroit: Gale Research Co. , 1981. 207-210.

Hecht, Anthony. & # 8220 ; The Dover Bitch: A Criticism of Life. & # 8221 ; The Bedford Introduction to Literature. Ed. Michael Meyer. 3rd erectile dysfunction. Boston: St. Martin & # 8217 ; s Press, 1993. 960.

Hecht, Anthony. & # 8220 ; More Light! More Light! . & # 8221 ; Norton & # 8217 ; s Anthology of Modern Poetry. Eds. Richard Ellman and Robert O & # 8217 ; Clair. 2nd erectile dysfunction. New York: W.W. Norton, 1988. 1073-1074.

Hecht, Anthony. & # 8220 ; The Vow. & # 8221 ; Literature: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama. Ed. X.J. Kennedy. 4th erectile dysfunction. Glenview, IL: Scott, 1987. 725-726.

Reading in Contemporary Poetry: Anthony Hecht & # 8217 ; s & # 8220 ; Letter & # 8221 ; and & # 8220 ; Nominalism. & # 8221 ; hypertext transfer protocol: //www.diacenter.org/prg/poetry/94_95/hcht.htm, 5/26/99.

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